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have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
and mr. mayor you mentioned the different varieties but we shouldn't leave out the sciences as well so a lot to celebrate. when i was first introduced to our relatively new counsel general by angela he said "he's one of us" and angela said "i'm not so quite sure counsel general" but i shared with him when i took my seat on the board of supervisors i got a call from jay leno. true story. he called me to congratulate me on my public office and glad to know that other lenos were fairing well and asked if we had family in common and he laughed when i said i was part of his russian jewish part of the family so i left it with that. this is particularly appropriate to do this in san francisco and san francisco is a italian city and always has been and will be and to get things going i have seen you put in some years of service in telea eve and familiar with israel's politics you can get into san francisco's politics and i brought this and i know senator will say something as well and we want to congratulate you and all of our italian american community as we kickoff the year of italian cu
academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see people with a drink in their hands, getting to know maybe somebody new
that educators will continue the science experience. john. >> reporter: they locked the doors a few minutes ago here at the palace of fine arts. thousands turned out to say thank you and see you later. people came from all over the country and around the bay. the wongs from san jose are regulars. >> so i son loved this place. it's a lot of things for him to play hands on. he got to learn a lot of things. >> reporter: inside, eight-year- old james went right to his favorite. >> these are circles, where you can spin them. they just go around the table. >> reporter: the exploratorium closes here tomorrow. >> try it one more time. >> reporter: it's pioneered interactive science 43 years ago, the idea even more crucial today. >> it was actually boring in school, but when you come here, you get to do it, and it's like, oh, you know this is fun so when you grow up, you remember it. >> reporter: the exploratorium has offered hands-on science experiments to millions of young people and also trained 6400 teachers to be science teachers. >> we decided to come and explore the exploratorium while it was sti
honorary degrees, she's been the first of everything, ran the national science foundation, she was the -- >> nuclear regulatory commission. >> nuclear regulatory commission. and she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at mit. amazing. [applause] nancy-ann deparle is assistant to the president and the deputy chief of staff for the executive office of the white house. she's an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she's been called the health czar of america, the point guard overhauling the american health care system. how about that for a job? >> there you go. >> what a powerhouse right here. [applause] so we, actually, have a lot of brain power up here right now. [laughter] and i wonder, all of you could have done very different things. you really had a lot of choices. so i'd just love to hear you about how you ended up picking what you did. who wants to start? >> you have the -- >> no. >> i'm a failed violinist. of laugh -- [laughter] i was raised to be a musician, and my mother still asks me what happened. [laughter] but i was always interested in p
is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a
it. generally we say magic is -- >> science we can't explain. >> but this one is actually a science we can explain. there's an app for that. >> aw, all right. >> it's called cycloramic. it uses the phone's vibration and sensors to make it turn by itself. it was awarded a pogy award for brightest ideas of the year in "the new york times." >> let's see the picture you got. >> and there is one other thing. >> how much does it cost? >> 99 cents, it's not terribly expensive. but no audio. >> what? >> just one big picture? >> i just noticed this. unless you realize what it's doing and you kind of look at the camera, it's just a boob shot. some pervert came up with this app. it's just a spinning boob shot. >> i love this app! >> it's in the early stages, but people are playing with it i think it's really cool. >> it's a perv cam. >> it's a pervert cam! >>> son is pulling a potty prank on mom with this freaky thing. >> he shuts all the lights off and he sets up the camera by the bathtub here. >> see how mom ta >>> specially when you get good video of them and nobody gets hurt. >> mammoth mo
idea he used to carry an exhibit around to show people what he meant by a science museum exhibit. >> thejl publicity. these pictures are from a film. c, frank made this one to show how one pendulum will send another into motion. it's part of a must seem mistry. after frank built it he noticed someone made feet to put on:jo the bo<$tf+ so we don't know who did that. >> over the next four decades it grew up. along with generations of families. many people now on staff came here as children. >> i have many memories coming here as a kid. we come here, i demand more time and demand to come back. >> it now has a thousand exhibits in the collection z it's an international leader in who is known as informal education. the staff estimates 08% of the world science centers have exhibits here. they run a hugely successful program training science teachers. the museum has done so well, it's outgrown it's birth i place. so it's movering here to pier 15. the massive building renovations is just about finished then taking three and a half months to move in old exhibits. all ready for a grand op
exploratorium while still at the palace of fine arts one more day to do it. hantdz on science museum reopen at new home in april. so admission at the old building is free for now. dan looks back at the report. >> palless of fine arts originally built for the 1915 panama pacific exposition. it was made to lack like an ancient ruin with huge display hall alongside it. half century later that hall would be reborn as revolutionary new museum. >> tornado help mick a tornado. >>reporter: man with the idea was frank oppenheimer. >> whole point of the exploratorium is to make it possible for people to feel they can understand the world around them. i think a lot of people have given up with that understanding. >> frank was a brilliant physicist and educator. he died in 1985 but legacy is intensely alive both in the museum itself and in documentaries including one by filmmaker john els. frank pioneer of the hand on museum. instead of don't touch the exhibit, touching them was essential. at first it was a hard sell. >> really new idea. used to carry an exhibit around in the truching o
is temporarily closing its doors. tomorrow is the last day for the science museum at its location at the palace of feign arts. it will be moving now to a much larger spies at pier 15 in mid- april. until then educators will tweet where they will hold pop-up science exhibits. visitors say the exploratorium makes learning science fun. >> it was actually boring in school, but when you come here, you get to do it and it's like this is fun. so when you grow up, you remember it. >> tomorrow admission will be free for everyone who wants to visit the exploratorium one last time at its original location. >>> the road that leads to lamenteur beach is closed. police say a cull voter failed. as you can see, a large section of the road buckled. officials say all of the park's facilities or trails are opened, but the beach and the hospital tell -- hostel will not be available. >>> a group of people celebrated new year's day with a swim. they almost made it look like summer for just a moment, but their polar bear plunge turned into a quick exodus from the frigid pacific ocean. the man who organized the plunge
health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will
.d. in political science from this institution, a master's in philosophy from the hebrew university of jerusalem and a d.a. in english literature from swarthmore college. i feel sort of silly introducing these people because everyone knows who they are, but still, i have to. serve as the editor in chief of commentary magazine from 1960- 1995, and is their current editor at large. he was awarded the presidential medal of freedom by george w. bush. he served as a senior fellow at the hudson's -- hudson institute and was a senior fellow and is the author of many books and articles, including the bush doctrine, what the president said, and what it means, world war four, the long struggle against islamic fascism, and why are jews liberals, which is a reviewer for the new criterion said should really have been titled, why are jews still liberals. he was a pulitzer prize scholar at columbia university where he earned his bachelor of arts in 1915, and he also holds a bachelor's and master's degree from cambridge university, england, where he was a fulbright scholar and a cut fellow. in addition he has a
architect has designed the california academy of sciences, the wonderful building in golden gate park. he has also designed similar museum in italy in my city and the museum is almost finished there, and our ambition is to have him come over and celebrate at the academy, and also talk to young architects about the most sustainable ways to build this century. other questions? if there is no other question i thank you so much. thank our distinguished guest for being here with us and i hope to have a good time with you guys at the italian cultural institute. thank you. [applause] is our last meeting of 2012. >> commissioner yee? >> yes, go ahead? >> just an update, we wanted to remove an update on student nutrition services and will be taken up at a special meeting next week. >> thank you.. so i will move on to item c, recognition and resolutions of commendation. the first one is an commendation of "the world as it could be," human rights education program on the occasion of the 2012 international human rights day. offered by commissioners murase and mendoza. >> is there a motion? >>
on science museums in the country. >>> cardinals have won the rose bowl for the first time in 40 years. they beat the badgers and running back taylor scored two touchdowns. stanford ends the season at 12-2 and victory helps the mayor win a friendly wager with the mayor of madison, wisconsin. he will have to wear a stanford cap at an upcoming city council meeting for a day and planted a tree in honor of the cardinals. wow! >> today, san jose valley christian high school band returns home after performing in the rose parade yesterday morning. they are the ones wearing blue. they made history marching with beijing's marching band wearing red. they performed as the east west fusion all-star band. they also performed at disneyland. >>> traffic and weather are next on the morning news. let's take a live look outside. meteorologist mike nicco will have your full accu-weather forecast. sue hall is keeping an eye on traffic in our traffic center. >> a warning, for people going near the ocean after a walk on the beach ends in tragedy. so, we all set? i've got two tickets to paradise! pack your b
piece looking at the world will be like in 150 years in the role of science and technology will play in our future. thanks so much for being with us from new york city today. guest: thanks for having me. happy new year. host: why look into the future? guest: you know, the world as we know, the world did not end on december 21st. so, i think this is really good time to look -- we've been all sort of focused on that date, not all of us, some of us. this is a good time to look into the future. we have a very popular department that we do every month called 50 and 100 and 150 years ago. this is where we go back into the archives of scientific american and we pick out things that people were writing and a lot of things people were writing were predictions about what the future would bring. we thought that we would turn it on its head and actually just do a whole package of articles in our january issue which is out on newsstands now. it looks at what could happen scientifically, technologically in the next 50, 100 and 150 years. host: you look at things like drone. also nuclear issues
the way, he developed a literary curiosity that pivots from dystopian visions of science fiction to the 19th century classic novel, "moby dick." in captain ahab's whaling crew, men of every race are thrown together in pursuit of the elusive and the mythical. diaz sees in this a parable of america then and now. he teaches creative writing at m.i.t. and recently received a prestigious macarthur fellowship, the well-known and coveted "genius grant." junot diaz, welcome. >> oh, thank you for having me. >> well, i've wanted to have you, because i've wanted to ask one of america's foremost storytellers, "what's the story you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the rep
at the embarcadero. exploratorium was one of the first hands on science exhibitions in the country. we were just there with the kids about a month ago. there is so many things to do and hands-on learning, it's the best. today is free. >> it is 4:37. we want to take advantage of mike nicco. i know one word, we need you mike. >> okay, yeah. >> for information. >> i don't have any money, what else do you want? let's talk about spare the air. poorest air quality in the santa clara valley once again, but all of us are under spare the air and possibly again tomorrow. so no burning of any type of wood. other big story, freeze warning in the north bay, mid 20s until 9:00. frost advisory for the bayshore line and santa clara valley, temperatures in the low 30s through 9:00. keep the pets in and plants protected until that time. once we get passed that, by noon mostly sunny and upper 40s. low to mid-50s by 4:00, so slightly warmer than yesterday. clouds will lead us to a chilly evening with upper 30s to mid 40s. as we head into thursday, friday and saturday, partly cloudy on thursday. slightly warmer on f
. >> we have science new. a comet headed our way by the end of the new year would be brighter than full moon. scientists say the comet is scheduled to fly within a million miles of the sun on november 28th. heat could vaporize ice and if it survive that's could produce a spectacular tail visible in the night sky. but again that, is november. we have a ways to wait for that. >> we have spectacular skies right now. >> we do. clifz right now. here is a live view of the post sunset skri looking at western sky now. this is our east bay camera in emeryville. beautiful clear skies right now. you can see just a little bit of a post sunset glow there. enough clouds off in the western skies to add nice color to the sun sex it's been a beautiful new year's day around the bay area, skies clear at this hour. we look at live doppler 7 you can see know clouds showing up on screens here, no green indicating any sort of precipitation around the area so. it's dry but getting chilly right now. temperatures down to 46 degrees in napa. 47 in fairfield and antioch. 45 in livermore, 47 in los gatos. 49 redwoo
in the economic zone. the japan agency for marine, earth, and science technology will send a ship to an island about 2,000 kilometers southeast of tokyo. the ocean there is more than 5,000 meters deep. the researchers plan to extract samples of mud by sinking a pipe 20 meters into the seabed. then they'll analyze the types, densities, and locations of rare earth metals. a group from the university of tokyo found high concentrations of the metals in the area last june. they estimated the deposits could satisfy japan's needs for those materials for more than 200 years. analysts at the u.s. geological survey says china accounts for 97% of global output of the metals. >>> fresh or frozen? many gourmets say that's what separates a fine dining experience from a soggy tv meal. now a small japanese company is ready to send the question itself the way of the ice age. >> reporter: this high-end sushi restaurant in tokyo serves extremely good tuna. it's frozen, but you'd never guess. these are the advanced freezers which preserve the fish's freshness. the secret is magnetic waves. food is kept constantly
earth science and technology will send a ship to an area near an island about 2,000 kilometers southeast of tokyo. the ocean there is more than 5,000 meters deep. the researchers plan to extract samples of mud by sinking a pipe 20 meters into the seabed, then they will analyze the types, densities and locations of rare earth metals. a group from the university of tokyo found high concentrations of metals in the area last june. they estimated the deposit could satisfy japan's needs for those materials for more than 200 years. analysts at the u.s. geological survey say china currently accounts for 97% of global output of the metals. >>> fresh or frozen? gourmets say that's what separates fine dining experience from a soggy tv meal. now, a small japanese company is ready to send the question itself the way of the ice age. >> reporter: this high-end sushi restaurant in tokyo serves extremely good tuna. it's frozen, but you'd never guess. these are the advanced freezers which preserve the fish's freshness. the secret is magnetic wave he is. food is kept constantly vibrating so that ice crysta
of recognition, please? [ applause ] also joining us is the science department chair and the lead author of the report that led to the blue-ribbon designation. so congratulations as well. [ applause ] >> go cardinals. >> do you want to say a few words? >> sure. i would like to thank the board of education, richard and all the outstanding student superintendent and staff and pta and i would like to give a shout out to dakota and jim and allison. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> i wanted to wait for all commendations to take place so that i don't take away from this, but what i would like to do is have some privilege here and maybe make last comments for my last general session after eight years of serving on the school board. i have to say it's been a real privilege to have been here for eight years in this capacity and working with everybody in the school community. i think we have done a lot in eight years. we have accomplished a lot. we have steadily gone uphill in regards to student outcomes. people are beginning to trust us a lot more now in regards to the public in terms of
do not have the space most middle school have such as a gym, science lab or computer lab. locating an additional 300 middles schoolers on the campus raises concerns for a variety of reasons, most importantly the safety of young children on campus. my daughter has always been weary of the big kids. and i'm sure she is not alone. the idea of having over 300 more big kids on campus that will already have 140 middle schoolers and 13-14 and 168 in 15-16 is frightening for parents and children. if you have been to the campus and i do invite you to visit, you know how compacted the shared space already is. we look forward to the time when the annex is operational and question begin to use the refurbished space. i would like to make a quick [kph-epbgs/] mention of the capacity issue. capacity cannot be viewed only in terms of numbers of students per classroom. the capacity analysis must take into account specialty uses for assembly, library -- one more second please -- library, dance and art and we don't believe there is enough yard space to safely support the population of both schoo
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
four years the bay hash improved 10%. cooperation and science have overcome the narrow interests of opposition.. >> he bay's health -- the bay's health still gets a grade of d-plus. he remains it can be restored tt health. >>> new year, new rules for parking in montgomery county. short term and long term parkink rates increased in silver spring and north bethesda. it jumped to a buck an hour. long term rates went from 60 to $.65.6. monthly parking permitspe increased to 123 higher rates are expected toto bring in $700,000 each year. a study shows speed cameras are working in maryland.g a recent evaluation by the state highway administration shows the cameras have slowed down drivers on 7 state roads. aaa mid-atlantic has seense reductions in speeding. drivers are slowing down when the cameras are not operating. >>> so we can feel veryve comfortable and secure, and it's a good feeling. >> fresh start after tragedy for the yo u.n. g students of sandy hook elementary school. >> claims it entertains. tiny to the has a good time on the vacuum cleaner. -- tot has a good time
and medicaid and va health care and one form or another. the best of them all, science is not proven. you hear those things and you just can't believe that in this case the republicans are believing what they say. this creates a wall of distrust and frustration that spills over. on the republican side, they listened to what democrats are saying and think the democrats are not necessarily trying to strengthen the economy by inv t investing in education and pandering to the voter. you get the clash of world views that is a major factor and probably the primary factor in congressional gridlock. >> sort of picking up on the point, there was an interesting piece a few weeks ago. he analyzed the election results and said there were two parallel americas that have taken place. the democrats of young voters and they are clustered tightly in cities and metropolitan areas that obama won this year by winning 150 fewer counties nationally than michael dukakis. that's 130. 130 fewer than michael dukakis won. that vote was able to deliver it for president obama. because it is so packed, you have a majority
. whatever, science, history, it's all going to be harder. maybe you can get through math without reading and maybe not. with the kids can't read well, some of them will not get through high school. if your kids can't read well, their choices and opportunities in life will be limited. they're not going to have as many choices. but the cool thing about books, the really terrific thing is that there are so many really good books out there for them to read. right here the at the book fair, there are a lot of looks that really absolutely -- to your kids. "harry potter," a turkic series, wimpy kids, terrific illustrations. books about sports. fine, if you have boys let them read anything. comic books, great, graphic novels, sports, almanacs certainly, cook books, why not? as long as they are reading because they will get better at it. who love soccer? yeah would love soccer. are you better now? how come? we play a lot. the same with reading. if you read more, you get better at it and it gets each year. you read better books. you have something that -- so i would love you all to get that into y
of standing at the intersection of the arts and sciences. whenever you see him to a product launch back in the period of the ipod, the ipad and the iphone de ended with a picture on the screen as the art, the liberal art street intersection with the scientist st.. and i realize there was a common theme with feinstein -- feinstein and benjamin franklin. it was a creativity is not necessarily just being smart, because those of you here probably know a lot of smart people coming and you know that smart people are dying of dozen. they don't amount to much but it's an innovative, creative and imaginative person who inset thinking different as steve what say and amounting to something in the bill was the common thread of the different people that i had written about so i got excited about a rare opportunity to be really up close to somebody that had transformed our world to be able to spend a day after day and hour after hour with him to be able to try to write a story that looked at creativity, innovation and beauty. so what i would like to do today i hope what we in louisiana call a little
was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that innovation cannot occur. and that is the main reason that companies that try to be innovative are not inn
and moving. the science museum is relocating after 43 years tat pa las of fine arts in the marina. it'll reopen in a much-larger space at peer 15 april 17th. it's offering free admission tomorrow. during the closure the museum says it'll offer pop-up exhibits all around the city. >>> a contra costa neighborhood plagued with break ins fights back. the surveillance video that led to arrest and one resident's campaign to inspeier more action. >>> and who says you had to be in pasadena to saver it. bands take in the nail-biting finish to a klassic rose bowl. >>> frosty freezing conditions moving back into the bay area for tonight. coming up, the advisories that will move into place and what you can expect for your area coming up look at you guys with your fancy-schmancy u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to download a song. that's sixty seconds, for crying out loud. we know how long a minute is! sitting, waiting for an album to download. i still have back problems. yo
sciences, engineering and art that has given birth to perhaps more game makers and changers than any other place in the real world and was the home of -- >> find the best in everybody. >> mike: professor randy palm whose last lecture became a phenomenon. it was a viral inspiration to millions but he was an inspiration to the smiths long before that. >> from the beginning of us starting this company he said "you guys really have something here. you have something unique. and keep developing that. keep making a-- make the best company you can possibly make and shoot for the stars." >> mike: shooting for the stars. they can do that. >> it will take you a long time to design a square head on this guy. >> yeah. >> mike: it's no secret that the new media-- both the internet and digital devices-- has taken a large bite out of the newspaper and magazine businesses. but there are some notable exceptions. we'll take you now to one company that is determined not to let the sun set on old media. it is doing more than just scratching for chicken feed in the media barnyard. it is planting the seeds of n
, the deadline from. while the specific day is not based on science, this is not an arbitrary deadline, we need to make a decision around that time if we're going to do something other than, other than the base case. i would suggest that, if i might , perhaps the wording of the resolution to address what i think is a very clear issue of trust be something along the lines that if we're not able to achieve option 4, that we return to you on the meeting of february 5th, which
unfortunately staff members are part of it. i remember being accused early on by a science teacher and told i was using lsd and i didn't know what it was at the time. i was in the class for three months and didn't work english and the teacher didn't realize i didn't speak english and there was only 20 in the classroom and bullying can take different shapes and not paying attention and caring and while we're focusing on what kids are doing to each other, we must not ignore that sometimes adults can be part of the problem just by their behavior, even by the way they look the other way. i agree with richard 100% that we need to deal with this but zero tolerance has to be articulated in a very different way. 36% of kids that are bullied everyday report not coming to school. there is another piece that is important. as a member of the justice center we did intensive study of school discipline last year and looked at a million roashds and 60% that are disciplined incredibly more likely to drop out of school and end up in the criminal justice system and while we are working with the victims and
to also teach our students, the workforce, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of pipe. so you have to prioritize where they can go and fix the system. narrator: each city faces unique situations, so they must determine the asset management approach that best addresses these challenges. inspections can be done with various technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an opt
to their reporting you also have to document, we feel like this is the science of it which, you know, sounds a little sterile when you consider the emotional loss, but that you document each incident as it happens so you have a record and you also look at the climate, the culture, and also the perpetrator. we have a second piece of legislation that calls for the restoretive justice element that people were talking about with regard to bullying, not just lgbt kids but in general. there was a sect committee this year of men and boys of color and that committee came out with a number of pieces of legislation all based on alerting to more programs, actually codifying the issue and also consequences and solutions and particularly with an accent on looking on is suspension automatic, is expulsion automatic. cyber bullying, another dimension of all this, the new technology, we're all catching up, there are two, three pieces of legislation that i co-authored, i am not the sponsor, that deals with cyber bullying. i will say the social networking folks have been very cooperative about that. so just, in sum, w
science correspondent, robert bazell, to take a closer look at how such injuries are diagnosed and treated. >> reporter: the type of blood clot that struck mrs. clinton is potentially dangerous but it is not a typical complication of a concussion. >> patients who have a concussion very rarely have this type of injury. this would be similar to the clot that she had. >> reporter: it's more common that a concussion would cause bleeding inside the brain. but doctors say a brain scan looking for that problem would find the clot. and most patients get brain scans after concussions in routine follow-ups. mrs. clinton's clot formed in a vein that is on the surface of the brain. the vein carries blood to the heart and lungs. the big danger is that the clot could grow larger, causing blood to back up into the brain. that could cause a stroke. doctors prevent that with blood thinners which slowly dissolve the clot. once the clot was discovered, doctors say mrs. clinton would have gotten an iv drip with a strong blood thinner, replaced a few days later with a less powerful thinner in pill form. the en
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. doctors say they are confident that hillary clinton will make a full recovery after the blood clot was found between her brain and skull. secretary clinton is viewed as a needing a presidential contender in 2016 sif she chooses to run. on the day when hillary clinton was supposed to be returning to workwork she spent another day at a new york hospital being treated with blood thinners, they expect her to make a full recovery and she will not suffer a stroke or neurological damage, her doctor is not involved in her case but he has treated cases like cars and he calls them ryder. the chairman of the department of medicine at atlantic hospital... >> i think for future is as good as her past, she will recover from this and she will be treated with blood thinners, i cannot say how long because i don't know all of the circumstances but certainly a minimum of three-six months. she should recover fully and get back to work. >> and that work is growing, she has traveled to more
math metically, where science ends, the part that makes you feel good but you don't know why, the way the object feels and looks and you can almost if it's perfectly created explain it to somebody else afterwards but in the creation part you can't. you can see how the glass is constantly moving. my job is to basically shape it. and balance it at the same time. you do that, you get these wonderful shapes, glass really rewards the risk. lot of times with glass you're waiting for the piece to cool down and temperature to adjust and split seconds where you've got a fraction of a second to make a particular move in a particular way and you don't get to repeat it if could you it wrong so there's a performance to it. it's sort of like dancing. you can't really think about it and do it really. you just have to do it enough that it becomes sort of mechanical, and then you can sort of free your mind to design. ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash before your eyes. make it worth watching. introducing the 2013 lexus ls. an entirely new pursuit. >>> a member of the paparazzi is de
was given the boot by security. >> academy motion pictures arts and sciences extended the oscar voting deadline to tomorrow over fears issues of the new electronic voting system we will learn who was nominated next week patti ann. >> top sports stories northern illinois makes the first trip to the bowl championship series but it was anything but memorable. it was no match for the orange bowl. the huskies lost 31-10. they went on to beat the badgers 20-14. stanford's first rose bowl victory in 40 years. >>> angie reed may not be without a team for too long. they contacted the former coach and topic to coach the team. espn reports he could accept the job by the end of the week. >>> all things must come to an end including the clipper's 17 game winning streak. the nuggets won it was the longest streak since 2008 and franchise record for the clippers. >> the time 42 after the hour. still to come they asked members to pay more money but it turns out one teacher's union wanted to raise dues to pay for parties. we always hear being fat can kill you but could holding on to just a few extra pou
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> joining me now is daiftd web and jason riley this, is predictable as election season comes and goes. going back to 1998, missouri, democratic party radio ad. elect republicans black churches are going burn. al gore goes for a black audience goes into preacher mode. rbi republicans don't want to count new the census. hillary clinton changes her cadence. it's predictable. they did it this election season y do they keep doing it? >> because it work autos well... i think it does work. to some extent. >> the left likes to complain but you listen to rhetoric and think that is the last thing in the world they want. take the situation we just have gone through. here, you had the nation's first black president just reelected trying to nominate the third black un ambassador to become the third black secretary of state. this would be considered fro pro gres. -- pro grechls but no. instead left -- . >> she's a woman, it's about race. >> right reduced to being a black woman instead of credentials she used to get the job. so we know the
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ ♪ >> greg: that song doesn't work anymore. >> kimberly: yes, it does. >> greg: i hate new year's eve resolutions because they don't exist. if every predictable reporter or news reader never brought them up again you'd never hear of them. it's true. the average person doesn't consider them until a chucklehead with a cheery smile brings it up. with doris, ill open for wkab. what are you giving up this year? if she would respond with "lame reporting" with a chick to the shin or groin. why do the media do this every year? fearful of to do anything different. resolutions are a symptom. think of the trite gar banal that passes for commentary in the media. shallow attempts at psychoanalysis discussing root causes of violence. what is worse is their infatuation with symbolic. you could say that is my resolution but then you have license to punch me in the face. >> kimberly: by goodness. that is real evidence -- >> andrea: can i punch you in the face because you banned resolu
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> two monumental shifts in american culture in 2012, two states voting to legalize marijuana and same-sex marriage is legal in nine states and the district of columbia. president obama tipped the scales with the stunning announcement he now supports same-sex marriage. >> how much of it is personal, how much is political? is this a game changer? just yesterday clay aiken said he wished president obama would, quote, hurry up. you must be pretty happy that he reacted so quickly. >> i am. i feel so empowered. >> i mean, a big day, you know, every gay american, a big day for every american in america, whatever reaction you had to it. how did you feel when you heard the news? >> you know, it is a little bittersweet. i'm in north carolina and as a north carolinian, i was really disappointed with the way the amendment initiative vote went yesterday here in nort
a concussion suffered in a fall several weeks ago. joining me now, nbc's chief science and health correspondence, bob bazell. and also with me "the washington post" ruth marcus. first to you, where this clot was found, a follow-up mri we were told on sunday night, and we were told it was a clot stemming from the concussion from the fall. does that mean that the clot was necessarily caused by the concussion or could it be from an underlying condition, or is there no way to really know that fact? >> it may have been caused by both of those problems. sometimes there's sort of a perfect storm of issues going on with any individual patient, with potential histories of history of blood clots in the past, as well as head trauma. this can increase the risk of getting a blood clot in that part of the brain. >> let me ask you also about how potentially dangerous this is. we know that this is near the brain, not in the brain, it is in the area between the skull and the brain. it is behind the right ear, we're told. we don't know a whole lot more. we are told today the secretary is on with he
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